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About Us

The National Resource Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention (National Resource Center) offers resources and technical assistance to states and local communities to come together to prevent youth violence. We believe that with the right resources and support, states and local communities can collaborate to foster safe and healthy school and community environments that prevent youth violence and support the overall well-being of all children and youth, regardless of their ZIP code.

Contact Us!

For help, contact the National Resource Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention.

Who We Are

American Institutes for Research is proud to partner with the following organizations to form the National Resource Center:

  • Center for School Mental Health (CSMH)
  • Center for Social Innovation (C4SI)
  • Community Science  
  • The Council of State Governments (CSG)
  • FHI 360
  • National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association (NAAPIMHA)  
  • National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA)
  • National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA)
  • National Leadership Council for African American Behavioral Health (NLCAABH)
  • ZERO TO THREE (ZTT)

What We Do

The team of experts and resources available through the National Resource Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention can help your community build and support collaborations among education, public health, behavioral health, child welfare, juvenile justice, and law enforcement.

Here’s what we offer:
  • Dedicated support for states and communities funded under the Safe Schools/Healthy Students and Project LAUNCH programs
  • Prevention resources for states and communities seeking to build youth violence prevention programs
  • Technical assistance to select, implement, and evaluate programs and services
Together, we can work to:
  • Use a public health approach to change the way we address youth violence
  • Engage youth and families in our work
  • Support trauma-informed approaches
  • Provide culturally and linguistically competent services and programs
  • Decrease differences and reduce disparities among racial, ethnic, and sexual minority communities
  • Improve the delivery and financing of behavioral health services
  • Introduce, support, and nurture collaboration among and between systems at the local, state, and national level